How Two Huge Runs Helped The Hoosiers Beat Iowa

Scoring runs, especially in a sport like basketball where you score often, are one of the most exhilarating experiences for both players and fans. They also demoralize your opponent and change their mindset from “trying to win the game” to “trying to stop the bleeding”.

The Indiana Hoosiers needed two of them on Monday night to get their 77-64 win over the Iowa Hawkeyes. The Hoosiers got a 17-1 run right before halftime and then, after allowing the Hawkeyes to go on a 16-2 run of their own, the Hoosiers regained control with an 18-0 run during the middle of the second half to put the game out of reach.

“I was really pleased, for the most part, other than the lack of responsibility coming out of halftime,” said Indiana Coach Archie Miller. “That just can’t happen, especially at home. (But) we ended up digging ourselves back out of that hole and were able to finish the game off.”

Here is a breakdown of what transpired during the two key runs that helped Coach Miller earn his first Big Ten Conference victory:


Iowa 19, Indiana 17 (9:08-1st half)

The first IU run started with De’Ron Davis splitting a pair of free throws. Josh Newkirk would then take a rebound coast-to-coast for the go-ahead layup with 8:03 left. Two minutes later Jordan Bohannon split a pair of free throws to tie the game. (20-20, 6:25-1st half)

Indiana grabbed the missed free throw but was unable to get anything on the fast break. The Hawkeyes’ defense stifled the Hoosiers during the offensive possession, almost forcing a shot clock violation. Yet Devonte Green threw up a fadeaway three-pointer with one second on the shot clock and, like his two half court shots last season, he somehow made it. (IU 23-20, 5:54-1st half)

The Hoosier defense went into lockdown mode over the next 83 seconds, forcing three consecutive Hawkeye turnovers. On the offensive end, a Robert Johnson steal led to a Juwan Morgan layup and a Collin Hartman steal led to another difficult jumper by Green. The third turnover had Green making a great pass to Johnson for three more points. (IU 30-20, 4:33-1st half)

After a quick timeout, Iowa committed its fourth consecutive turnover as Josh Newkirk got the steal and while he missed the layup, Green was there to clean it up. (IU 32-20, 4:11-1st half)

The Hawkeyes finally got off their first field goal attempt in five possessions but missed the shot. Hartman got the rebound and Johnson was sent to the foul line, where after the TV break he hit both free throws. (IU 34-20, 3:43-1st half)

Stats during the 17-1 run:
6-of-9 shooting (66.7%)
2-of-3 from three (66.7%)
3-of-5 from the foul line (60.0%)
7 rebounds
1 assist
4 steals
2 turnovers
Iowa shot 0-of-7 (1-of-2 from the foul line) and had 6 turnovers


Morgan, who finished with a double-double (15 points and 10 rebounds), wasn’t a huge factor in either of the Hoosiers’ big scoring runs but deserves credit for helping end Iowa’s large run.

After Iowa had cut it to 43-42, Morgan rebounded a missed Green layup and drew the foul, making both free throws. The Hawkeyes would again cut the Hoosier lead to one point when Morgan again came up with a clutch rebound, this time drawing the foul and making the bucket for a three-point play.

Thanks to his two huge offensive rebounds and five straight points, Iowa never had the ball with a chance to take the lead away from Indiana and thus let the Hoosiers hang around long enough to recover and go for the kill.

Indiana 53, Iowa 50 (13:05-2nd half)

Iowa would score their last points for six and a half minutes on a Cordell Pemsi layup where he was fouled. Pemsi would miss the foul shot, with the ball rebounded by Hartman. The newly entered Davis then went to work as he converted a layup on a pass from Hartman and then blocked Dom Uhl on the other end. (IU 55-50, 12:21-2nd half)

Iowa retained possession but missed another layup that was again rebounded by Hartman and led to a three-pointer in transition by Newkirk. Uhl would then commit a turnover that would take the game to the under-12 timeout. (IU 58-50, 11:41-2nd half)

Out of the timeout, Hartman would connect with Davis again in the paint for two. Davis then stole the ball on the next Iowa possession and got fouled but he ended up missing both free throws. The Hawkeyes couldn’t take advantage as they continued to miss shots, missing six in a row at that point. Meanwhile Johnson and Davis scored on layups while Hartman hit a three-pointer that forced Iowa to call a timeout. (IU 67-50, 8:59-2nd half)

Even with Johnson, Davis, and Hartman now all on the bench coming out of the timeout, the run continued. Iowa would miss three more shots as Morgan added a layup and Zach McRoberts added a running jumper to cap off the run and seal the game for the Hoosiers. (IU 71-50, 7:15-2nd half)

Stats during the 18-0 run:
8-of-10 shooting (80.0%)
2-of-3 from three (66.7%)
0-of-2 from the foul line (0.0%)
9 rebounds
6 assist
2 steals
1 block
1 turnover
Iowa shot 0-of-9 and had 3 turnovers

Advertisements

The Four Things I Learned About “The Archie Miller Era” From Today’s Press Conference

It lasted only 45 minutes, but during those 45 minutes the Indiana Hoosiers have already created a new identity that will be called “The Archie Miller Era.” Here are the four things that were mentioned during Miller’s press conference that already have Indiana on a new path:

  1. A Tough, Nasty Defensive Team: The Tom Crean Era was defined as a break-neck paced offense with a defense that was sometimes good but at other times very bad. Archie Miller’s philosophy asks for the same free-flowing offense (but not quite as fast), but also asks for his teams to be tough and nasty on the defensive end. Specifically he asks his players to be “tough-minded.”
  2. Non-Conference Scheduling To Help Seeding: There has been a lot written about Indiana’s non-conference scheduling over the years, so it wasn’t very surprising that the first question asked to Miller was his approach to scheduling. Miller’s answer really got the press conference off on the right foot as he talked about how the non-conference schedule is all about getting Indiana a resume that will help get it a better seed in the NCAA Tournament. In fact, Miller said “the non-conference scheduling component  is probably the second most important thing you do as a coach other than recruit.”
  3. Redshirting And Limiting Scholarships: Crean’s philosophy towards roster management was always about not letting a scholarship go unused, but that has led to problems such as juggling too many players and facilitating playing time that resulted in “strange” substitution patterns. Miller addressed that he plans on regularly playing nine to ten players and thus doesn’t feel the need to have all 13 scholarships used at the same time. What was most interesting about his statement was that he wasn’t against using all the scholarships but those extra three/four players would likely be transfers sitting out a year, or projects that would be redshirted. Not having a full roster would also prevent the need to worry about having enough room for incoming recruits, something that had been a problem during the final four years of Crean’s tenure.
  4. Recruiting Inside-Out: The biggest reason a section of the IU fan base really wanted an Indiana guy for the job is because the state of Indiana has a great amount of talented high school players who instead of coming to Indiana have decided to leave the state to commit to other colleges. Recent examples from the class of 2017 include Kris Wilkes (UCLA), Paul Scruggs (Xavier), Malik Williams (Louisville), and Jaren Jackson (Michigan State).  Miller made it abundantly clear with his “Inside-Out” approach that he will do his best to recruit the best that Indiana High School hoops has to offer.

“The inside-out approach means that we have to dedicate ourselves to the high school coaches in this state, the high school talent in this state , and the grass-roots programs in this state. You’re not going to get every player, but if we want them, we should have a great chance of getting them.”

However the Inside-Out approach isn’t limited to Indiana. While the home state is the priority, Miller brought up the fact that some of the best Hoosiers weren’t originally from Indiana and that the Hoosiers need to take advantage of the recruiting footprint it has created and still recruit those areas. If Miller can’t get the type of player he wants from the state of Indiana, he’ll get that player from somewhere else. You can trust Miller to keep his word about recruiting the state, after all, eight of his Dayton players were from Dayton’s home state of Ohio.