Indiana’s NCAA Tournament Hopes Look Grim After Home Loss To Michigan

When the NCAA Selection Committee showed their top 16 teams this weekend, a grim reality sunk in for the Big Ten. None of the top three teams (Wisconsin, Purdue, Maryland) were among those top 16, showing that the Selection Committee does not think highly of the Big Ten this season.

That’s why it was so important for Indiana to beat fellow bubble team Michigan at home. Instead, the Hoosiers lost and now look at the realistic situation of needing to win the rest of their regular season games just to have a chance of playing in the NCAA Tournament.

Unlike the last two losses (at Wisconsin/vs Purdue) where the Hoosiers battled a top team in the conference and fell just short, IU never really gave Michigan much of a battle as the Wolverines scored the first basket and never let Indiana take the lead once. Michigan led by as many as 13 while the Hoosiers never got closer than six points in the second half.

Thomas Bryant, who had averaged 20.2 points over his last five games, was constantly doubled as he was limited to just eight points, five rebounds, and three blocks. Unfortunately, the Hoosiers had a difficult time turning the double team to their advantage and getting the ball to the open man, as Indiana again committed 15 turnovers that led to 20 points for Michigan.

The one person who did step up was De’Ron Davis. Two days removed from taking a shot to the face that made him miss most of the second half against Purdue, Davis was the only Hoosier able to take advantage of Bryant’s double-team as he scored a team-high 13 points on 4 of 5 shooting, including 5 of 6 from the free throw line.

“He played very well considering shot that he took (against Purdue),” said Indiana Head Coach Tom Crean. “And we’ve got to continue to play him more. He’s not as great in the ball screens so that sometimes limits (his minutes). But he’s very, very hard to guard and he’s got great feet, great hands and great eyes.”

Crean was really frank about his team’s performance, saying his team needs to get easier shots on offense and has to play with the same intensity as when shots do go in the basket. He was especially frustrated with the team’s consistent overhelping on defense.

“It makes no sense to be coming off the corners the way that we are with what we have out there. That’s not what we do. We guard the ball. We don’t overhelp because it’s teams like Michigan that can shoot the ball so well.”

Crean also talked about everyone on the team needing to improve communication, including himself.

“It’s very easy to be locked in and connected to one another when the shots are going, but when they aren’t going is when real leadership’s got to emerge. And I’m not shirking the responsibility one iota. One thing I’ve learned in nine years it all falls on me. But the bottom line is that we’ve got to do something to get communication up.”

“We still have a season left to play,” said Robert Johnson about his team at this moment. “So we’re not even thinking about quitting. We always look forward to the next game. Now we’re just looking forward to getting better and moving on to the next game. And that’s another opportunity.


With Indiana probably needing to win out to keep its NCAA Tournament hopes alive, here is a breakdown of the final five games:

  • February 15 – at Minnesota
  • February 21 – at Iowa
  • February 25 – vs Northwestern
  • February 28 – at Purdue
  • March 4 – at Ohio State

The problem with Indiana’s remaining schedule is it’s difficulty level. The slate of teams may not all be at the top of the Big Ten standings, but that doesn’t matter when you realize the Hoosiers have struggled heavily on the road this season, going 1-5 so far with the one win coming via a James Blackmon Jr. buzzer-beater at Penn State.

There’s also the fact that other than beating Purdue in West Lafayette, none of the other potential wins would be huge resume-building wins. Iowa and Ohio State are likely going to the NIT, and while Minnesota and Northwestern would be nice wins, neither is guaranteed to be in the NCAA Tournament and both would likely take a hit to their resumes if they did lose to Indiana.

Basically the formula for Indiana to have a shot come Selection Sunday is to get a huge win at Purdue and pad the overall record by avoiding anymore losses. It will be a tough road ahead, but if Johnson is right and this team isn’t quitting, they still have chance no matter how small.

The Episodic Summary Of Indiana’s Triple-Overtime Win Over Penn State

How does one go about summarizing a triple-overtime marathon that saw Indiana just do enough to get a much needed win?

Indiana’s 110-102 victory over the Penn State Nittany Lions had so many subplots and plot twists it practically qualifies as its own soap opera. So by dividing all of the periods (two halves and three overtimes) into their own episodes, here is the series breakdown of the five part mini-series known as Penn State at Indiana (2017):

Episode 1: Controlling The Boards

Summary: Off the heels of two embarrassing blowout road losses to Michigan and Northwestern, there was no way to overstate how important it was for the Indiana Hoosiers to win this home game against Penn State. However the Nittany Lions were out for revenge after losing at home to this Hoosier squad due to James Balckmon’s buzzer-beating three-pointer.

The Hoosiers jumped out to an early 11-6 lead that was quickly countered. Penn State made four straight three-pointers and took a 20-16 lead into the 10-minute mark of the first half.

That’s when the tide turned in the Hoosiers’ favor as Indiana outrebounded Penn State 10-2 over the next 6 minutes, including six straight rebounds at one point. Josh Newkirk scored 11 of his 12 first half points and Thomas Bryant scored 7 of  his 13 first half points during a 22-4 that had Indiana up 38-26 with 4:17 left in the first half.

The last four minutes of the period featured Penn State star freshman Tony Carr dishing out four of his six first half assists and Zach McRoberts showing that he can dunk. The first half, and the episode comes to a close as Indiana takes a 46-37 lead.

Episode 2: Tony Carr Strikes Back

Summary: A top 100 recruit out of Philadelphia, freshman Tony Carr is a rising star for the Nittany Lions. Carr had possibly his best game of the year when Indiana came to Penn State as he scored a career-high 24 points. However at halftime he had just two points on 1 of 3 shooting. He did have six assists but the Nittany Lions would need his scoring if they were to come back in this game.

Carr did just that as he went 4 of 8 in the second half and scored 12 points while also adding four assists to give himself a double-double in regulation. Nine of those points came during the first seven minutes of the second half when the Nittany Lions went on a 17-8 run to tie the game at 54.

The Hoosiers did there best over the next 12 minutes to never let Penn State take the lead. Four times the Nittany Lions tied the game, but each time Indiana responded by taking the lead again.

That is until Carr scored his final points of the second half as his “and-1” layup gave Penn State its first lead of the second half with 38 seconds left.

Bryant, who was up to 18 points at this point, responded by drawing a foul with 24 seconds left, giving him a chance to tie the game from the free throw line. Unfortunately he only made one of his two foul shots and forced the Hoosiers to have to foul Penn State’s Lamar Stevens.

Another talented freshman, Stevens had a game-high 20 points when he went to the free throw line with 22 seconds left. On top of that, Stevens was an excellent free throw shooter as his 81.3% from the foul line ranked fourth in the whole Big Ten. However, Stevens also was only able to make one of two and the Hoosiers had one more shot, down 72-70.

Stevens compounded his mistake of missing one of the free throws by fouling Indiana freshman De’Ron Davis with just three seconds left. With all of Simon Skjodt Assembly so quiet you could sit in the top row of the balcony and hear a pin drop onto the court, Davis did what neither Bryant nor Stevens could do as he made both free throws to tie the game.

The episode ends as Josh Reaves tried to break Indiana’s heart like the Hoosiers did to Penn State with Blackmon’s buzzer-beater, but Reaves buzzer-beating layup was too high off the glass as the horn rang.

Episode 3: At The Buzzer

Summary: Overtime starts with Penn State getting out to an early lead thanks to two easy dunks by Julian Moore. Blown defensive switches by Indiana looked to signal that the team was running out of gas, especially when the Nittany Lions took a 78-74 lead with 1:35 left.

After a 30 second timeout, the Hoosiers were faced with a possession that absolutely needed to end with a score. Freshman Devonte Green was unable to convert on a layup but Bryant was able to grab the missed shot before missing too. With pent up frustration and desperation, Bryant grabbed his own miss and ferociously slammed the ball through the hoop and drew contact from Moore.

Yet again Bryant missed from the foul line but 20 seconds later a steal from Newkirk gave the Hoosiers a chance to tie the game. Newkirk, who had been 3 of 6 from deep so far, got a great look but it just wasn’t able to fall as the Hoosiers were forced to foul Stevens again, this time with 27 seconds left.

Luckily for the Hoosiers, lighting struck twice as Stevens again split the pair of free throws, making it a three-point game. Desperate to get any points, Bryant was able to convert a layup with 11 seconds.

This time Penn State had their team captain and senior leader Shep Garner go to the free throw line in hopes of forcing IU to have to hit a three to continue the game. However, foul shooting again plagued the Nittany Lions as Garner was only able to make one of two.

With six seconds left, Newkirk was given the option to find the open man or take it to the rim himself. He chose the latter and skated around the defense to make a buzzer-beating layup to tie the game and send it to another overtime.

Or did he beat the buzzer? The last part of the episode takes several looks at the layup and whether or not it should count. Penn State Coach Pat Chambers was convinced it didn’t and his players start to celebrate their win. Yet one angle shows the ball just leaving the top of his fingertips as the backboard lighted up. That combined with the referees initial call of a good basket made the referees decide to count the basket and tie the game at 80.

Episode 4: Missed Opportunities

Summary: The episode opens with Coach Chambers still upset that the basket was counted but he quickly regroups and gets his players ready for the second overtime. Unfortunately his players still seem preoccupied with the call as they aren’t ready for the start of the period as Indiana scored four quick points to take its first lead since the final minute of the second half.

Sensing they have an opportunity to put the game away, the Hoosiers put the ball in Bryant’s hands and he proceeded to score eight of his career-high 31 points in the period and push Indiana’s lead to as much as six points.

With his team on the ropes, Carr again took over as he scored seven of his 23 points in the period including a huge three-pointer that cuts Indiana’s lead down to 92-91 with 36 seconds left.

In a reversal of roles from the first overtime, Newkirk was now at the line with a chance to make it a three-point lead for the Hoosiers when he only makes one of his two free throws. Carr then had the chance to hit the go-ahead three-pointer but it fell short as Green gathered the rebound and was fouled with 11 seconds left.

One made free throw would force a Penn State three-pointer to extend the game and two made free throws would clinch the win for Indiana. Unfortunately the nerves got to the freshman Green as he missed both. Carr redeemed himself as he drew a foul and tied the game by making both of his free throws.

Green is given a shot at winning the game but the episode ends as Reaves blocked his shot as the buzzer sounded yet again with both teams tied.

Episode 5: Green’s Redemption

Summary: The final episode warms up with both teams trading baskets, but it’s with 3:05 left after Newkirk hits a big three-pointer to give Indiana a 98-95 lead and it’s first make from behind the arc since the second half that the moment of truth occurs.

In an incredible plot twist, it wasn’t the short-handed Hoosiers that made the fatal error due to fatigue, but it was the Nittany Lions as the ensuing lackadaisical inbound pass was stolen by Green who redeems his two missed free throws as he made it a two-score game with the easy layup.

Green continues his redemption as he makes all four of his free throws in the period, and in the process achieved his first career double-double.

Things start to look unresolved when Bryant fouled out and Penn State narrowed Indiana’s nine point lead to just four with 43 seconds left but Newkirk and Rob Johnson closed the game out at the foul line as the Hoosiers as a whole went 10 of 10 in the third and final overtime.

When Nazeer Bostick’s three-point attempt missed and fell into the hands of Davis with Indiana up eight points with 13 seconds, Coach Chambers called for his players to stop fouling as the marathon finally came to a close.

For the Hoosiers, it was a huge win as the team improved to 5-5 in Big Ten play. But most importantly, it showed that these Hoosiers have too much heart to quit.


Cast (Boxscores):

Penn State:

Tony Carr – 23 points (7-17 FG)(2-7 3FG)(7-10 FG), 5 rebounds, 14 assists, 42 minutes.

Lamar Stevens – 26 points (9-17 FG)(2-3 3FG)(6-9 FT), 8 rebounds, 42 minutes.

Shep Garner – 16 points (5-15 FG)(4-11 3FG)(2-5 FT), 3 assists, 50 minutes.

Indiana:

Thomas Bryant – 31 points (13-18 FG)(1-1 3FG)(4-8 FT), 11 rebounds, 2 steals, 44 minutes.

Josh Newkirk – 27 points (9-14 FG)(4-8 3FG)(5-8 FT), 2 blocks, 46 minutes.

Rob Johnson – 27 points (10-17 FG)(1-5 3FG)(6-6 FT), 11 rebounds, 50 minutes.

Devonte Green – 10 points (3-11 FG)(0-4 3FG)(4-6 FT), 10 rebounds, 4 assists, 45 minutes.

De’Ron Davis – 9 points (3-8 FG)(3-3 FT), 8 rebounds, 2 steals, 2 blocks, 22 minutes.

Blackmon And McRoberts Step Up In Win Over Michigan State

With the loss of OG Anunoby, the Indiana Hoosiers know they need multiple players to step up to make up for his impact. During the Hoosiers’ 82-75 win over Michigan State on Saturday, those players were the unlikely duo of James Blackmon Jr. and Zach McRoberts.

Already averaging a team-high 17.5 points per game, Blackmon went above and beyond his usual scoring performance as he hit his first six shots (four of which were three-pointers) and finished with 33 points, tying his career-best scoring performance.

“He was ready to shoot,” said Indiana Head Coach Tom Crean. “His teammates did a great job getting him open. He (also) did a great job getting himself open with setups. His lift was good.”

Blackmon’s hot start was part of an incredible shooting display from the Hoosiers in the first half, as Indiana made its first six shot attempts from behind the arc.

“It makes it easier for all of us when (Blackmon) is hitting shots like that,” said Robert Johnson, who also provided an offensive spark with 17 points. “Guys have to try to make a plan to stop him, and that just opens up even more for us.”

While not as flashy as Blackmon’s performance, McRoberts played just as vital of a role in making up for the absence of Anunoby.

The walk-on from Carmel was a surprising choice for the fifth starter, but the risk paid off as McRoberts had his fingerprints all over this game as he finished with three points, five rebounds, three assists, two steals, and a block in 32 minutes of play. He also led the team in +/- with a +14 and deflections with an incredible 16.

“We know what Zach (McRoberts) can do. That’s why we’re confident when he’s out there,” said Blackmon about McRoberts’ impact. “He brings that energy and he does the little things that we need.”

McRoberts’ numbers are magnified because of the direct impact they made. Three of his five rebounds were on the offensive end, one of which set up an easy three-pointer for Blackmon that gave Indiana a 9-8 lead that the Hoosiers wouldn’t relinquish the rest of the game. He even made his only three-point attempt when the Spartan defense played too far off him.

“He works extremely hard,” said Crean. “He’s one of those guys that he wants to make (his teammates) better but he’s got to be reminded that he’s pretty good too.”

The performances of McRoberts and Blackmon showed that the Hoosiers have players capable of stepping up in Anunoby’s absence. It won’t always be them in particular but it reassured fans that the Hoosiers as a team are taking the challenge head-on instead of possibly using it as an excuse. The next few games will let us know who else on the team is ready to rise to the challenge.

Indiana Flirts With Multiple School Records In Blowout Win Over Austin Peay

With Big Ten season about to start, the Indiana Hoosiers used their last tune-up game as a chance to make team history.

The Hoosiers flirted with three different school records during their 97-62 win over the Austin Peay Governors. They ultimately fell short on all three but the Hoosiers look more than ready for when they face Nebraska next Wednesday and transition to the conference play

Here is a look at the three school records that were within striking distance on Thursday:

Most Threes In A Game (Team):

  • IU Record: 19 vs Illinois (2016)
  • Attempt At Record: 15 vs Austin Peay (2016)

The magnitude of this record has gradually desensitized due to how many times this record has either been broken or threatened. This became the ninth time under Head Coach Tom Crean that the Hoosiers have made at least 15 three-pointers in a game. The Hoosiers have already broken the record twice in the past two years, hitting 18 against Minnesota during the 2014-2015 season and then breaking it the next season when the Hoosiers made 19 against Illinois. On Thursday, the Hoosiers made 11 three-pointers in the first half, making the necessary 20 to break the current record a realistic goal. After the final buzzer sounded, seven different Hoosiers made a three-pointer including Devonte Green, who made a half- court heave right before the halftime buzzer.

“Yeah, once you see one or two go down, the rim gets a little bigger,” said James Blackmon Jr. about the team’s three-point shooting.

Most Threes In A Game (Individual):

  • IU Record: 9 (Roderick Wilmont and Matt Roth)
  • Attempt At Record: 6 (Robert Johnson)

Robert Johnson opened the game on fire, hitting three three-pointers in the first four minutes of the game. It was so ridiculous that Johnson attempted a “heat-check” three (or basically a difficult shot you’re only allowed to attempt when you have made a couple in a row) with 15:35 still left in the first half. Johnson only slowed down a little as he finished the first half with five made shots from behind the arc. Yet the inevitable blowout cut Johnson’s time short in the second half as he only made one more deep ball after halftime. His six three-pointers set a new career-high and he fell one point shy of matching career-high for points in a game (he finished with 20).

“I was just getting a lot of open shots,” said Johnson about his performance. “It just happens the way we move the ball. It can be any guy at any time. So when you see an opening you just gotta take it.”

Most Assists In A Game (Individual):

  • IU Record: 15 (Michael Lewis and Keith Smart)
  • Attempt At Record: 11 (Josh Newkirk)

This seemed very realistic when Josh Newkirk dished back-to-back assists to Juwan Morgan with five minutes left in the first half. After the second layup went in, Newkirk had already accumulated eight assists after just 15 minutes. Newkirk was a big reason behind Johnson’s performance, assisting on four of his six three-pointers. In fact, seven of Newkirk’s 11 assists were on three-pointers. However, the most impressive thing about Newkirk’s performance was the fact that he didn’t commit his first turnover until six minutes into the second half, after he had already dished out his 11th and final assist of the night. Newkirk also recorded his first career double-double as he also scored 11 points.

“I was more in attack mode,” said Newkirk about his career-best night. “When I saw the defense colliding I just made the simple pass.”

 

 

Indiana Plays Like A Champion In Front Of 1981 Title Team, Beats #3 North Carolina

Before the game, former Indiana baseball star Kyle Swarber was honored for helping the Chicago Cubs win its first World Series in 108 years. During halftime, the 1981 Hoosiers were honored for winning the NCAA championship 35 years ago. Following each of those two events were two 20-minute periods that culminated in the 2016-2017 Indiana Hoosiers beating the #3 North Carolina Tar Heels 76-67 and looking very much like a team that could be honored on its own one day as a champion.

Coming off an impressive performance in Maui, the Tar Heels were put in an unfamiliar position as they never led once on Wednesday with the Hoosiers taking control of the game from the tip and never letting go thanks to some great defense and rebounding.

“Coach (Rob) Judson did a great job with the game plan”, said Rob Johnson about how the Hoosiers were able to slow down the explosive offense of the Tar Heels. “He gave us a breakdown of everything each guy liked to do. So we just wanted to take those away and make it tough for them.”

“We know their bigs are the best in the country”, said Thomas Bryant about the importance of keeping North Carolina off the glass, “and we knew that we had our work cut out for us at the beginning. So we wanted to establish that mindset and get out there and get after them.”

On the offensive side, OG Anunoby stepped up in a big way as he led the Hoosiers with 16 points and added five rebounds, two assists, and two blocks before leaving the game with an ankle injury in the final minutes.

Anunoby is a bit of an enigma, as came onto the scene late during his freshman year as a three-and-D wing. This season, he’s trying to show that his athleticism can translate into him becoming a superstar. While not close to being one yet, his importance was clear last week when a serious illness kept from being much of a factor during the Hoosiers’ upset loss to Fort Wayne. That’s what makes his performance on Wednesday so encouraging and his ankle injury so potentially discouraging.

Yet even if Anunoby misses time, the Hoosiers showed they were a great TEAM on Wednesday with multiple players playing crucial roles in the victory.

  • Thomas Bryant (14 points, 7 rebounds, 2 steals) scored seven of the Hoosiers first 11 second-half points to counter North Carolina’s comeback attempt in the early minutes after halftime.
  • Rob Johnson (11 points, 6 rebounds, 3 steals) was the first half catalyst as he scored seven points and assisted on another basket to help the Hoosiers jump out to a 17-7 lead during the first six minutes.
  • James Blackmon Jr. (14 points, 9 rebounds, 3 assists) came back after missing the last game and grabbed six rebounds during the final 10 minutes of the game, including a couple of huge defensive rebounds that helped prevent the Tar Heels from narrowing the Hoosiers’ lead.
  • Josh Newkirk (10 points, 3 assists) did a great job running the offense at times and De’Ron Davis (5 points, 3 rebounds, 2 blocks) was a key part of the Hoosiers’ 13-4 run that ballooned the Indiana lead to 28-11 midway through the first half and also made a clutch post-up bucket with 3:02 left to push it to a three-basket Indiana lead.

People remember the 1981 Hoosiers as being Isiah Thomas’ team. While he was a big part of their success, they wouldn’t have cut down the nets if it weren’t for the play of Ted Kitchel, Ray Tolbert, Randy Wittman, and Landon Turner.

While it’s way too early to compare this season’s group of important players to those legends, the potential for them to work together and complete the same goal is a very real possibility. Anunoby, Bryant, Johnson, Blackmon, Newkirk, and Davis are all capable of playing a key role in winning a championship.

Just like Schwarber played a key role in the Cubs winning a championship.

Three Reasons The Hoosiers Are On The Brink Of Winning The Big Ten

The Indiana Hoosiers took care of business on Thursday as they easily defeated the Illinois Fighting Illini 74-47 thanks to a dominant second half performance. With the win, the Hoosiers now sit at 13-3 in Big Ten play and are closing in on their second conference championship in four years.

Yet how did a team left for dead at the beginning of December turn things around so drastically?

Here are three reasons the Hoosiers are one win away from clinching at least a share of the Big Ten title and two wins away from winning the conference outright:

  1. Depth: Very few college basketball teams have nine players  who can contribute on a nightly basis and the Hoosiers take full advantage. Combining their breakneck pace with their ability to rotate players in and out keeps their players relatively fresh enough to make a game-ending run when the opponent becomes gassed. It has also helped the team weather what could have been a season-ending injury when James Blackmon Jr. went down right before Big Ten play began. Instead, freshmen OG Anunoby and Juwan Morgan have grown up quickly and have provided superior defense along with adequate offense.
  2. Schedule: Let’s not ignore the elephant in the room: the Hoosiers had a very easy early Big Ten schedule. This was even more important for the Hoosiers as it coincided with their period of trying to adapt their rotation after the loss of Blackmon. Looking back at a couple of those games it’s almost shameful to think that the Hoosier only beat awful Rutgers by 7 points. But those early games against lesser competition let the Hoosiers make a successful transition while not hurting their record. At the end of the day, you can’t control who you face in your conference and the Hoosiers took advantage of things breaking right for them.
  3. Yogi Ferrell: The senior point guard has been great throughout his entire career at Indiana but this year he has taken it to another level. In Big Ten games this season, Ferrell is averaging 17.8 points, 3.3 rebounds, and 5.2 assists per game. On top of that, his defense has reached a level he’s never played at before and it has resulted in 1.31 steals per game in conference play for a player who has never averaged over one steal at any point in his college career. But what’s been the most impressive is his leadership. I only mentioned Big Ten games because those are the games he’s played with Blackmon out of the lineup, showing that Ferrell has stepped up in his absence. Ferrell reinforced the notion that he can carry the Hoosiers when the team needs it by posting 27 points, 5 rebounds, and 5 assists against Illinois in a game Indiana was without Rob Johnson and saw Troy Williams play limited minutes due to an injury. In the second half alone, after trailing the Illini 28-27 at half, Ferrell had as many points in the second half (19) as the whole Illinois team. He may not win Big Ten Player of the Year, but Ferrell has arguably been the most valuable player in the conference and is starting to climb the list of greatest Hoosiers of all time.

Multiple Records Fall As Indiana Obliterates Illinois

Coming in to Tuesday night’s game against the Illinois Fighting Illini, one of the Indiana Hoosiers’ basketball records was expected to be broken. Yet when the final buzzer sounded and the Hoosiers walked off the court with a 103-69 win, they did it knowing that they had actually broken two school records.

The first one that was expected to be broken was Indiana’s career assist record. Kevin “Yogi” Ferrell came into the game one assist behind previous record-holder Michael Lewis’ 545 assists. Ferrell surpassed that with a no-look pass to Max Bielfeldt in the post who converted an easy layup to give the senior point guard the record at the 11:19 mark of the first half. Ferrell didn’t stop there as he finished with nine assists and also added 16 points.

“That’s a great honor,” said Ferrell about becoming the Hoosiers all-time leader in assists. “I played with a lot of great guys coming up: Victor Oladipo, Cody Zeller, Jordan Hulls, Christian Watford, that’s what I like to be. I like to be a facilitator for my team, and I feel like I’ve gotten to have known my teammates very well all four years.”

One of those players took to twitter to express how proud he was of his former teammate.

The other record that fell was made three-pointers by the Hoosiers in a single game. The Illini clogged the paint to begin the game, having all five players circling around the free throw line. The defensive gameplan was to prevent the Hoosiers from getting easy buckets in the paint and instead have them settle for jump shots. Unfortunately for Illinois, the Hoosiers were up to that challenge as they made the Illini pay by making five of their first seven three-point attempts. Even when Illinois starting defending the three-point line, the Hoosiers were still firing as Indiana finished the game with 19 made three-pointers. Not only is that an Indiana record for most in a single game, but it also set a record for most three-pointers made by one team in a Big Ten game.

“(The Illini) were locked into knowing that they were going to come with a lot of edge and energy on the glass,” said Indiana Head Coach Tom Crean about Illinois’ defensive approach against the Hoosiers. “Once we figured out that we needed to continue to go to the paint to get our three-point shots we were much better.”

Nine different Hoosiers made a three-pointer, with Ferrell leading the way with five. Rob Johnson and Nick Zeisloft had three three-pointers, Bielfeldt and Troy Williams had two three-pointers, and Colin Hartman, Thomas Bryant, OG Anunoby, and Harrison Niego all added one three-pointer.

The lone bright spot for Illinois (9-10, 1-5) was Malcolm Hill, who scored a team-high 20 points and added five rebounds. Indiana (16-3, 6-0) was led in scoring by Williams, who finished with 21 points along with four rebounds and five assists.

The Hoosiers will face another Big Ten school from the state of Illinois as Indiana hosts Northwestern on Saturday at 12pm in Assembly Hall.

From The Boxscore:

  • Not only do the Hoosiers have the most threes ever in a Big Ten game, but they also hold the record for the second, third and fourth most in a Big Ten game.
  • This was the fourth time this season that the Hoosiers have scored in the triple-digits and the first time they’ve done it without James Blackmon Jr. In fact, JBJ had at least 20 or more points in those other three games this season.
  • Everyone on the Hoosiers who attempted a three-pointer made at least one. Collin Hartman, Thomas Bryant, OG Anunoby, and Harrison Niego each attempted just one shot from behind the arc and made that shot.
  • Troy Williams had a team-high 21 points and added five assists without committing a single turnover. He also made two three-pointers. “Tornado Troy” was nothing but positive for the Hoosier tonight.
  • Just being on the receiving end of Kevin “Yogi” Ferrell’s record-breaking assist would have constituted a great night for Max Bielfeldt but his performance didn’t stop there. Bielfeldt finished with 16 points, 3 assists, and team-highs in rebounds (8), steals (3), and blocks (2).
  • Lost in Ferrell’s performance, Rob Johnson again flirted with a triple-double, He finished with 13 points, 7 rebounds, and 6 assists.
  • The Hoosiers have now won 11 games in a row, one short of Tom Crean’s best winning streak as the Indiana head coach. His 2011-2012 Hoosiers started the season 12-0, which included the memorable buzzer-beating win over top-ranked Kentucky.
  • In addition to taking the top spot on the all-time assist list, Ferrell also passed Brian Evans for 11th on IU’s all-time scoring list.